Posts Tagged ‘Sun’

19
Sep

Especially In Alabama

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

The water’s chilly for late August. My biology teacher says the lake retains the cold air from the night before, but I wonder why it doesn’t soak in the heat of the sun during the day. Nature doesn’t make sense.

Rebecca and Claire are arguing over whether bras and panties count as skinny dipping. It doesn’t, no matter what Rebecca says. Claire decides I’m brave because I’m already in the water. But if the boys come they won’t be able to see anything.

I’ve decided I don’t care if they do. I wonder if that makes me a bad person.

13
Jul

The Golden Thread Part Two

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

“What is that? I can’t see. Some sweet jungle flower. Are we getting close?”

“No, it is poetry, a copycat fragrance to lure butterflies. It is carnivorous. Stay back—”

“Those are my words on the vines! God, those electric blue letters! Let’s read—”

“Don’t—”

“Why? ‘Once upon a time I died. I crucified myself on a ladder made from the bones of birds, hollow, not yet cleaned by cannibals or the sun, yet flightworthy by nature.’ I wrote that.”

“The vines will strangle you, make you blind, make you forget why you are here. And then you drop the thread.”

From Guest Contributor Brook Bhagat

Brook’s poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and humor have appeared in Empty Mirror Magazine, Little India, Dămfīno, Nowhere Poetry, Rat’s Ass Review, Peacock Journal, A Story in 100 Words, Anthem: A Tribute to Leonard Cohen, and other journals and anthologies, and are forthcoming in MoonPark Review and Almagre. She has completed a full-length poetry manuscript, is writing a novel, and is editor-in-chief of Blue Planet Journal. She holds an MFA from Lindenwood University and teaches creative writing at a community college. More at brook-bhagat.com

19
Jun

A Nice Girl

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

Samantha read The Great Gatsby, to her elderly grandmother Millie,
again.

She sat with the book in one hand and her coffee mug in the other. The
small room was warm and cozy as the sun beamed through the window.
Samantha took a sip of coffee and listened to the birds chirping and the
ticking of the wall clock. It was time to leave.

She kissed Millie on the cheek. “Okay, grandma, see you on Sunday.”

Samantha’s eyes teared as she left, knowing her grandmother no longer
knew who she was, other than a nice girl who came to visit.

From Guest Contributor Lisa M. Scuderi-Burkimsher

9
May

Writing Over

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

I had
This poem
That was like
Re-
Fusing
To be
Like junk
Running late
In your veins
Re-
Wiring
Memories
Before they
are made
Okay, they
are not
sunk in
That deep
But narrative
About this
Is on its
Way but
its late
just like
This feeling-
Passing-
Feeling
Re-
Living
Screens to
Sublimated
Dreams

I’m walking
And the sun
Hits me
Everyone wants
To have
Something
They don’t
See, in you
this poetry
Concealed in
A voice
But they will keep
Writing your
Story over
Before it is
One
Before once
Even noting
That your poem
Is already

From Guest Contributor Wyatt Martin

26
Apr

Ireland’s Descent

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

Niamh clambered down the rocks, grasping grass to ensure balance. Her eyes widened with adoration each time she peered over her shoulder espying tides crashing carelessly against bustling coral. To others it was an empty beach clinging to the base of Irish pastures, but to Niamh her struggle over the roughened pebbles opened the gates of Eden.

Her lens captured what she saw; pulsating amber beasts clinging to years of compressed life, silvery fish darting around with grand families and crabs working hard, hunting. Emerald weeds flowed through natural pools capturing the life of the sun. Images she trapped forever.

From Guest Contributor Kerry Kelly

17
Mar

Forever In Sunset

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

Seamus liked this time of day for visiting Breige. It seemed fitting.

She’d enjoyed sitting outside in her Yorkshire Fiddleback, just under the scullery window, breathing in the satisfied air of a full day’s work done as the chickens clucked down the hours to twilight.

She’d watch the sun set across the farm.

“Hell of an old gal,” Seamus sighed, manoeuvring to stand in the spot, watching his shadow sweep along the cemetery path.

The sun dipped, sending the shade of her headstone growing alongside his until it was shoulder to shoulder.

He reached out, smiling as the shadows embraced.

From Guest Contributor Perry McDaid

8
Dec

Two Birds

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

Tom and Ruth had been married forty years. The heart monitor was beeping with every breath Ruth took.

“I’m going to miss you,” Tom said. His weathered hands were one with Ruth’s. Two streams of tears ran from his eyes.

“I’ve lead a good life. I’ll be okay,” Ruth said.

“I don’t know how I’ll…” Tom asked.

“We’ll be together soon enough, love. The children need you. You have to be strong for them.”

She closed her eyes quietly. A bird took off and flew high into the clouds towards the sun. Its counterpart sat pensively, wondering where to go.

From Guest Contributor Steve Colori

Steve was born in 1986 and during undergrad he developed schizoaffective disorder. Over the years he has worked hard to overcome the disorder and help others while doing so. Steve has published thirteen essays with Oxford Medical Journals, he has written freelance for Mclean Hospital since 2011, he writes a column with The Good Men’s Project titled “Steve Colori Talks Mental Health,” and he has a memoir available on Amazon, “Experiencing and Overcoming Schizoaffective Disorder.” A quote he has come to live by is “To Improve is to Change; To be Perfect is to Change Often.” (Winston Churchill)

22
Nov

The Widow’s Cat

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

I found a black widow shaking in the bedroom, sitting in the morning sun on the windowsill. She was mumbling the rosary in a small, desperate whine, like a faraway train trying to stop. Through a lace veil, draped over her head and the top of her abdomen, I could see the silhouette of the little beads slipping methodically through her jointed forelegs. She became still and silent and turned to me, her eyes, two rows of four, clouded and quivering. A tiny tear dripped off the end of her fang.

“Don’t worry,” I told her, “there is no Cat.”

From Guest Contributor Brook Bhagat

Brook’s non-fiction, humor, poetry, and fiction have appeared in Little India, Dămfīno, Nowhere Poetry, Rat’s Ass Review, Peacock Journal, and other journals and anthologies. She has completed a full-length hybrid manuscript, is writing a novel, and is the co-owner and chief editor of BluePlanetJournal.com. She holds an MFA from Lindenwood University and teaches creative writing at a community college.

4
Oct

It’s Not What It Seems

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

Mike, feverish, tossed in bed. Head aching and muscles tense, he dreamed of the beach, the hot sun beating on his face, when a voice awakened him.

“Babe, how are you feeling,” asked his wife Liz.

“My body feels like a truck hit it.”

“You heard what the doctor said. You have the flu. Rest, Tylenol and fluids is what he prescribed.”

“Yeah, well, the flu stinks and I feel like it’s more than the flu.”

“Stop being so dramatic. I’ll make you some homemade chicken soup. That should help.”

Mike laid back, closed his eyes, and never dreamed again.

From Guest Contributor Lisa M. Scuderi-Burkimsher

22
Sep

Match Light

by thegooddoctor in 100 Words

The flame exploded into being as the match head dragged across the sandpaper. It might have seemed magical, but really it was just that the glass-on-glass friction generated enough heat to kindle the match’s phosphorus.

The match provided the only light in the entire house, perhaps the entire city. Between the impenetrable clouds and the power outage, darkness had descended as quickly as the sun.

The illumination lasted long enough for Theresa to count the remaining matches. Seventeen. Each one guaranteed to ignite but she knew such guarantees were hollow.

Seventeen matches to survive until the end of the world.